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(4/30/18)
Showing posts with label FilmLA contract. Show all posts
Showing posts with label FilmLA contract. Show all posts

April 21, 2017

Are you covered?

Not long ago, I ran across a story about a filmmaker who got caught filming without a permit. Here's what happened.
"He [a fire marshal] essentially said to me, he didn’t care [if I had a permit] so long as I had done something to make the effort, but in good conscience he couldn’t just turn a blind eye. Meanwhile the permit office called around two and rejected my permit, but said I could probably get it for Thursday if I could hold off until then. I told them maybe and that I’d get back to her. We wrapped the location at 4 pm. The next day our production wrapped all together."
As a card-carrying member of the if-something-can-go-wrong-it-will club, I couldn't help but wonder: what if there had been an accident? What if this film shoot didn't have insurance? Who pays?

FilmLA's Contract
Details of the FilmLA contract are described in four previous posts:
  • Part 1: Mitigating the impact of filming
  • Part 2: Reporting obligations
  • Part 3: Permit processing
  • Part 4: Permit terms and conditions
To see the entire 2009 FilmLA contract, click here.
To see the 2014 renewal amendment, click here.
The same questions must have occurred to the LA County attorney who drafted the FilmLA contract. Indemnification requirements occupy a full 7 pages,  nearly 14%,  of the entire document. That's the same page count needed to describe FilmLA's entire Statement of Work.

Here's a few indemnification highlights (if you could call indemnification a highlight) from the FilmLA contract:
  • FilmLA must "indemnify, defend and hold harmless" the County, elected officials, employees and agents from all liability."
  • Insurance is mandatory. If FilmLA fails to have insurance, FilmLA breeches its contract.
  • FilmLA's indemnification of the LA County is not limited by the dollar amount of its insurance.
  • FilmLA cannot change or cancel their insurance until after the County has 30 days notice.
  • FilmLA cannot obligate the County to pay deductibles.
  • FilmLA has to let the County know if there is an injury or law suite that could result in a claim against the county.
  • FilmLA waives the right to seek recovery against the County.
It would appear that the County's deep pockets are protected from any law suit stemming from a film shoot. If something were to go wrong, FilmLA would be holding the bag. Apparently the insurance needed to meet the County's requirements is pricey. FilmLA reported paying $86,000 for insurance in 2013 and $120,000 in 2014.

On a related note, the California Film Commission has circulated a "Model Filming Ordinance" to local governments that recommends requiring film companies indemnify elected officials and government employees.  Curiously, LA County doesn't not have an ordinance of that sort. Indemnification provisions only appear in the FilmLA contract.

While it's good to know the County, and my tax dollars, are protected, I can't help wondering... am I covered?

What if an afternoon gust topples a 150-pound Arri HMI and it smashes my windshield? Who's paying for that?

According to item #5 in the Terms and Conditions 1 attached to every filming permit, the film company must have general liability and workers' compensation insurance. (The amounts of minimum coverage are left up to FilmLA.)  Consequently, FilmLA will not issue a filming permit unless they receive proof of insurance certificate that meets minimum requirements.

FilmLA requires the following minmum coverage to obtain a filming permit in LA County:
  • $1,000,000 in General Liability coverage
  • $1,000,000 in auto insurance
  • Workers' Compensation Insurance
These insurance policies can have a hefty price tag. Nancy Bond of Nancy Bond Insurance Services, estimates a short term liability policy might run $2,500 - $5, 000 depending on the risks associated with the production plan. A annual policy may run in the tens of thousands of dollars depending on the number of productions covered.



So...if a film company has a permit, they will have insurance.  Is there anything left to worry about?  We asked Nancy Bond and she offered the following advice:
Click here to see an example certificate of insurance
  • If you rent your property to a film company and there's an accident you could be held liable. For protection, make certain you obtain a certificate of insurance from the film company and that your name appears on the certificate as "additionally insured."

    Incidentally, liability may extend to neighbors who just rent a driveway for a porta potty or a yard for craft services. These neighbors should also obtain a certificate of insurance and ask to be named as "additionally insured."

  • Confirm that the certificate includes workers' compensation insurance. You may be liable if the company does not include workers' comp in the policy.

  • Be sure to examine the insured amounts on certificate of insurance. You may want to increase a few items that exceed the minimum requirements set by FilmLA.

    For example, check the "Damage to rented premises box."2 $300,000 is typical. If your property is worth more than the insured amount, consider requesting a higher coverage. Also check the "General Aggregate" box. You may be responsible for liabilities in excess of the policy. If you are concerned the amount of coverage, request "Excess Liability/Umbrella coverage. Amounts of $5,000,000 are not unusual.

    Note: The aggregate total is shared by all the 'insured' and the 'additionally insured.' When thinking about the amount of coverage remember that you are sharing the coverage with the production company, the County, FilmLA and any neighbors who are also covered by the same policy.

  • If you frequently host filming, your insurance carrier may consider you are running a business and require you to purchase a business endorsement.

  • Consider consulting with your insurance broker for the coverage you need when hosting renting your property to a film company.


Getting back to the story at the beginning of this post about the unpermitted film shoot... remember they were working without a permit and possibly without insurance. Is that against the law?

Aside from getting the filming stopped, apparently not.  At least in LA County.

While LA County has indemnification ordinances for taxi companies, cable TV vendors, news rack vendors, marijuana dispensaries, ambulance companies and sidewalk vendors, it does not have one for film companies.3 In fact, the County has many far more ordinances for oak tree removal than it does for film production. In other words, the County could fine you for removing an oak tree without a permit, but not for shooting a film without insurance.

That's not the case for filming in LA City. Don't get caught there filming without a permit. In 2011, the LA City Council passed an ordinance making filming without a permit illegal. If a filmmaker gets caught in LA City filming without permit they could be arrested, fined and their equipment confiscated.

Bottom line: If you host a film shoot, be sure the company has a filming permit and sufficient insurance. Otherwise, you could be running a liability risk
.

1 Here's a link to the Terms and Conditions appended to every permit.   Click here and search for "Exhibit U."
2 Certificates of insurance companies are typically issued on a 'Certificate of Liability Insurance' Accord form. Consequently, category names should be the same.
3 The following LA County ordinances stipulate indemnification requirements: taxis (7.80.230) Cable TV vendors (16.19.100), news rack vendors (16.27.090), Marijuana dispensaries (7.55.330), Ambulances (3.45.100), sidewalk dinning vendors(16.27.090), oak tree removal permit (22.56 Part 16).

September 5, 2016

The deal: LA County's contract with FilmLA, Part IV


Think back to the last time you purchased a plane ticket, signed up for insurance or installed new software. Did you actually read, carefully read, the terms and conditions before you signed up? I'm guessing that more than a few of you, like me, just shrugged off the job of studying that a legal-length page of small printed gobbledy-goop with this consoling thought: "How bad could it be if everyone does it?"

I'll suspect that's just what happens when the film company's "authorized company representative" puts his or her John Hancock on the approved filming permit. Chances are good it's been awhile since they read the LA County Terms and Conditions that accompany each filming permit. Who would blame them? You must have that permit. You aren't going to negotiate with the County. And, you're probably busier than the fried-Twinkie vendor at the state fair So are you going to wade through four pages of stultifying legalese? Doubtful.

So, perceiving a need, AF has once again muddled through the small print to try to fill the gap.

CAVEAT EMPTOR
Is this the actual active FilmLA contract?   I can’t say for certain.  But, it’s likely to be pretty close.
Here’s why:
  • This version of the contract was used for public hearings in 2009 when FilmLA was awarded a sole- source agreement. (A meeting may not have happened.)
  • The contract has the signatures of both the President of FilmLA and the LA County counsel.
  • The 2104 renewal of the FilmLA amendment says all terms and conditions “will remain the same.”
To see the 2009 FilmLA contract, click here.
To see the 2014 renewal amendment, click here.
So what's in the contract?
This posting is part 4 of an ongoing look at the contract FilmLA signed with LA County to become the provider of film permits.

In a nutshell, FilmLA is obligated to provide the four following county services:
  1. Coordinate and process film/still photography permits and fees for onlocation motion picture, television, and commercial production events
  2. Coordinate the issuance of film/still photography permits in a manner that balances the needs of, and attempts to mitigate the impact of productions on, area neighborhoods and merchant districts (my emphasis)
  3. Provide the County reports on a quarterly basis
  4. Market and promote the County to the entertainment industry
Item #1, item #2 and item #3 were summarized in previous posts. This will cover one of the contractual terms that appear in item #1: the LA County Terms and Conditions.

FilmLA is required to attached the LA County Terms and Conditions to every permit. In our view these Terms and Conditions are seriously lacking in levity, so AF will attempt to address this shortcoming by providing its own, unofficial variant.

Note: for those who would rather read the actual Terms and Conditions click here and search for "Exhibit U."




AF's Unofficial, easy-to-read reinterpretation of the
GENERAL TERMS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS FOR [A] FILMing PERMIT
for people like me

Whereas...
For the purpose of this document, "We" are FilmLA and "You" are the film company.   Now that is out of the way, We can get on to the good stuff.

1. AUTHORITY
We have authority to issue the permit but that doesn't give You permission to use a location without getting the permission of the owner. And, by the way You will need proof that you do have permission because we just might ask if you have it.

2. PERMIT REQUIREMENT
You better have this permit in your possession when you're on location. If we request it or if the public requests "it and must be made available for inspection."

3. RIDERS
If You want, We can change your permit with a "Rider." The rider only changes what the rider says. Nothing else changes. By the way, You must attach the Rider to the original permit — the whole is the just the sum of its parts.

4. COMPLIANCE WITH LAWS
You just agreed to comply with all laws unless the permit says You don't have to. Incidentally that includes parking regulations.

5. INSURANCE
This permit isn't worth the bits used to generate this image on your screen if You don't have the right insurance.

6. INDEMNIFICATION
By the way, if something goes wrong, We are not responsible. So if there's a law suit, You are responsible for defending FilmLA, the County Supervisors and anybody who works for the County that might have been caught in the crossfire. Oh by the way, that includes any and all damages. (Oh yea, if there was gross negligence when We issued the permit, there's an exception. Don't count on it.)

7. CONSIDERATION
No freebees. You have to pay first before you get either a filming permit or a rider

8. AUTHORITY TO REVOKE/CANCEL
If You get caught doing any of the following, We can suspend, revoke, cancel or amend your filming permit:
  • You unnecessarily endanger health or safety
  • You are about to damage to some property
  • You are violating the conditions of the permit
  • You aren't minding the "Filmmakers' Code of Professional Responsibility." or the following do any of the following:
    • Arrive before the time on the permit
    • Depart after the time on the permit
    • Move someone's car without their permission or the cops approval.
    • Ignore the parking signs or the parking conditions on the permit
    • Park your cars on both sides of the street without specific authorization on the permit
    • Trespass on someone's property
    • Cut trees or shrubbry without permission.
    • Leave trash, cables, porta potties or other detritus before the permit expires
    • Don't try to keep the noise levels as low as possible
    • Smoke outside designated smoking areas
P.S. We can suspend, revoke, cancel or amend your filming permit without being liable for the repercussions.
P.S.S. If things get bad, We can also deny giving You future permits.



Quite a list! If they ever need to use it, FilmLA has a very big hammer.

But, holding a tight reign on film productions would be a tough assignment for FilmLA; they would be playing rough with their very customers and as Harry Selfridge, of Masterpiece Theater prominence, famously said, "the customer is always right."

Incidentally, enforcement of the Terms and Conditions is the job of FilmLA. If for some reason, enforcement appears to be a problem, contact FilmLA on their 24/7 line: 213-977-8600. If that fails try appealing to the on-site law officer. If that fails, you're probably stuck. You might consider contacting the Altadena Filming Committee (altadenafilmingcommittee@gmail.com). Alternatively, You might consider taking your concerns directly to the LA County Manager responsible for monitoring FilmLA's contract. But, as far as I know, no one has ever felt the need to go there.

June 30, 2016

The deal: LA County's contract with FilmLA, Part III

1st recital of the FilmLA contract
"WHEREAS, there is a need for and interest in programs, projects and activities designed to encourage filming and expedite the processing of filming/still photography permits within the County to reduce runaway production and to encourage cooperation between residents, merchants and film production companies."
"Whereas" is just magic. It beats "abracadabra" hands down. In a mere 7 letters, it can transform an idea into a fact. No need for frog powder, the blood of a rooster or a fingernail clipping from a Supervisor. What could be easier?

Imagine if "Whereas" worked for physics? Consider the possibilities! "Whereas" there is anti-gravity..., or "Whereas" there is warp-speed..., or "Whereas" there is time travel... Boom! No more heavy lifting or long car trips. We'd even have YouTube videos of actual dinosaurs in addition to kittens and puppies. But, sadly the magic of "whereas" only works on matters of judgment in legal documents. Pity.

On the plus side, the Supervisors have proven that expediting filming permits is a lot easier than building an anti-gravity device. In September of 2009, the County signed up FilmLA to provide of our film permitting services and then extended their contract in 2014. If only all hard problems were this easy.

CAVEAT EMPTOR
Is this the actual active FilmLA contract?   I can’t say for certain.  But, it’s likely to be pretty close.
Here’s why:
  • This version of the contract was used for public hearings in 2009 when FilmLA was awarded a sole- source agreement. (A meeting may not have happened.)
  • The contract has the signatures of both the President of FilmLA and the LA County counsel.
  • The 2104 renewal of the FilmLA amendment says all terms and conditions “will remain the same.”
To see the 2009 FilmLA contract, click here.
To see the 2014 renewal amendment, click here.
So what's in the contract?
FilmLA is on the hook to provide the four following county services:
  1. Coordinate and process film/still photography permits and fees for onlocation motion picture, television, and commercial production events
  2. Coordinate the issuance of film/still photography permits in a manner that balances the needs of, and attempts to mitigate the impact of productions on, area neighborhoods and merchant districts (my emphasis)
  3. Provide the County reports on a quarterly basis
  4. Market and promote the County to the entertainment industry
I summarized item #2 and item #3 in previous posts. In this post I'll cover the contractual terms in item #1: Coordinate the filming process.



Item #1 is FilmLA's first order of business. It's what they do — process filming permits. In fact, FilmLA's very existence depends on the funds produced from fees charged for permit processing and monitoring. No filming permits; no film production in LA; no FilmLA. (FilmLA receives no funding from the County.)

The dozen activities that define permit coordination and processing:
Note: These activities only apply to "onlocation production in the unincorporated areas of the County ... and on County owned or leased property." Incorporated areas operate under different rules.
  1. Provide a one-stop resource for filming permit shoppers
  2. Obtain those irritating approvals and service charges from all applicable County departments including the Fire Department, Department of Beaches and Harbors, Department of Public Works, Department of Parks and Recreation, and the Sheriff's Department
  3. Collect all the service charges and send the funds to the County. (But don't keep any)
  4. Notify the film company when Special Conditions are connected with a location. (see the list of Altadena neighborhoods with Special Conditions.)
  5. Refer film company quibbles to the proper department for a contest of titans: County rules vs political influence
  6. Charge for the effort to coordinate and issue the permit. (This is the source of FilmLA's operating funds). By the by, keep enough of the cash on hand in case a film company stiffs the County
  7. Stick to the permit prices on the County menu. No jacking up the prices
  8. Apply the same application to all applicants, except for students and a few others who are scraping by
  9. Remember, the County's Project Manager can change the fees (based on the Consumer Price Index)
  10. Require permit applicants to have Commercial General Liability insurance
  11. Use the web-based system to record department approvals so stuff doesn't get lost
  12. Require the film company to submit to a set of "General Terms and Conditions" as a pre-requiste for granting the permit. And, just in case no one forgets, attach the "General Terms and Conditions, as well as the Filmmakers' Code of Professional Responsibility and any Special Filming Conditions to the permit
Two items on this list deserve a bit more detail: The insurance required for a permit and the obligation the film company takes on by signing the "General Terms and Conditions." I found a few surprises. You might as well. Stay tuned.

June 14, 2016

The deal: LA County's contract with FilmLA, Part II


In September of 2014, our LA County Supervisors renewed FilmLA's contract as the provider of film permitting services for the County. It's a 'no-cost, sole-source agreement.

 It's 'no cost' because FilmLA obtains its operating revenue from the permit fees it charges film companies. It's sole source because it's the only bona fide source for the County found for a film permitting service and because the Supervisors asked our County CEO to negotiate a contract with FilmLA — it was in the "best interest of the county."

The current contract runs until September 2019.

CAVEAT EMPTOR
Is this the actual active FilmLA contract?   I can’t say for certain.  But, it’s likely to be pretty close.
Here’s why:
  • This version of the contract was used for public hearings in 2009 when FilmLA was awarded a sole- source agreement. (A meeting may not have happened.)
  • The contract has the signatures of both the President of FilmLA and the LA County counsel.
  • The 2104 renewal of the FilmLA amendment says all terms and conditions “will remain the same.”
To see the 2009 FilmLA contract, click here.
To see the 2014 renewal amendment, click here.
So what does the county get for free?
County Counsel put together a pretty good deal. Here's what FilmLA is required to provide:
  1. Coordinate and process film/still photography permits and fees for onlocation motion picture, television, and commercial production events
  2. Coordinate the issuance of film/still photography permits in a manner that balances the needs of, and attempts to mitigate the impact of productions on, area neighborhoods and merchant districts (my emphasis)
  3. Provide the County reports on a quarterly basis
  4. Market and promote the County to the entertainment industry
I summarized item #2 in a previous post. In this post I'll cover item #3: Provide the County reports on a quarterly basis.

Who keeps track?
The FilmLA contract seems to be quite the bargain. County Counsel has written up an agreement that provides for a fair balance of industry and community interests.  We're getting plenty.  And it's free!

For example, the contract requires that FilmLA to comply with all "applicable Federal, State and local laws, rules, regulations, ordinances, directives, guidelines, policies and procedures." Very thorough. For example, the Supervisors have a policy that requires FilmLA use "recycled bond paper when possible."  It boggles the mind to contemplate what other obligations might be lurking. What about cubicle size or prohibitions against popcorn in the microwave?  Clearly the agreement invokes enough rules to keep FilmLA on the straight and narrow.

Is there a report card?
No government agreement is worth the recycled paper it's printed on without accountability. Fortunately, that detail was not overlooked by the LACO legal beagles. In the section titled "County's Assurance Plan" they set out the following reporting requirement:
The County or its agent will evaluate the Contractor's performance under this Agreement on not less than an annual basis. Such evaluation will include assessing the Contractor's compliance with all Agreement terms and conditions and performance standards. (Section 8.15)
The County calls this agent the contract "Program Manager." So happens that when the Supervisors renewed FilmLA's contract in 2014 they named a manager on the County's CEO staff as the Program Manager. (The Program Manager's contact information is available on the Altadenafilming.org contact list.

It's not clear when the Program Manager holds court or if these annual reports are publicly available. Gotta wonder what's in the reports?  Are they checking the copy room for fresh-from-the-forest copy paper?  What about checking on modifications to the permit issuance process to fix problems that drove up a production cost or caused ill-feeling in a neighborhood?  It would be interesting to discover what criteria are used in these evaluations.

Perhaps you're thinking, like I have, that FilmLA might only be reporting on attendance at the weekly birthday party or on the coffee-breaks-per-belly-button ratio while keeping potentially troubling data, like the frequency of film shoots, behind a Gru-like veil of proprietary secrecy. Well... we would be guilty an undeserved pessimism.

According a LACO ordinance (2.118.020) FilmLA is required to "Develop records, reports, and statistical data, including but not limited to, complaints, types, and number of permits, violations and area filming schedules." And, according to the "Public Records" section of the contract, these auditable documents become part of the public record.
Any documents and/or data submitted by the Contractor and all documents and/or data obtained in connection with the County's right to audit and inspect the Contractor's documents, books, and accounting records...become the exclusive property of the County. All such documents and/or data become a matter of public record and shall be regarded as public records. (Section 8.36)
So, in theory at least, the ordinance-mandated data that FilmLA collects should be part of the public record. In practice, this has not been the case. (see ...how the Altadena Filming Permit Map was created).

It's worth noting that FilmLA occasionally publishes high-quality, business research reports about the status of the film production in the City and County. If you're interested in the topic, the reports are worthwhile.

The latest news? Business is good!  Here's a link to a list of FilmLA's research reports.

May 23, 2016

The deal: LA County's contract with FilmLA, Part I


A while back a friend made a passing suggestion: "Why don't you ask the County to send you a copy of the FilmLA contract?"

"Great idea!" I said in an effort to appear open to suggestion while instantly dismissing the idea. I had no desire to plunge into a Kafkaesque bureaucracy. What did I know? Where would I start? Why would anyone help? I probably couldn't get a pothole fixed! How would I ever get LA County to send along FilmLA's contract? Best to leave that stuff to Woodward and Bernstein.

But then, for no other reason than to say I did, I reluctantly checked the internet. Bingo! In less than 10 minutes I was staring at a pdf version of the LA County contract signed by FilmLA. And to think, I could have been playing MegaMillions. Wasted luck. "So it goes..."

CAVEAT EMPTOR
Is this the actual active FilmLA contract?   I can’t say for certain.  But, it’s likely to be pretty close.
Here’s why:
  • This version of the contract was used for public hearings in 2009 when FilmLA was awarded a sole- source agreement. (A meeting may not have happened.)
  • The contract has the signatures of both the President of FilmLA and the LA County counsel.
  • The 2104 renewal of the FilmLA amendment says all terms and conditions “will remain the same.”
To see the 2009 FilmLA contract, click here.
To see the 2014 renewal amendment, click here.
You're probably asking yourself, "why the heck would anyone care about the County's contract with FilmLA? What nutcase would want to wade through 100 pages of gobbledygook?" I can't account for the latter question, but as for the former: FilmLA has the first and last word on who gets a filming permit in Altadena. So if you are a filmmaker or a neighbor with an interest in filming, I promise this gem is chock-full of useful information.

What has FilmLA been contracted to do for LA County?

The FilmLA's contract's includes a statement of work which lists four jobs:
  1. Coordinate and process film/still photography permits and fees for onlocation motion picture, television, and commercial production events
  2. Coordinate the issuance of film/still photography permits in a manner that balances the needs of, and attempts to mitigate the impact of productions on, area neighborhoods and merchant districts (my emphasis)
  3. Provide the County reports on a quarterly basis
  4. Market and promote the County to the entertainment industry

In this post I'll only cover job #2. In subsequent posting, I'll cover other parts of the contract.

Job #2: Balancing needs and mitigating impact
The LA County Counsel who drafted the contract was definitely concerned about the impact filming might have on the businesses and neighborhoods that would serve as studio's new backlot. In that spirit, the contract outlines six need-balancing, impact-mitigating tasks for FilmLA.

Task 1: Notification
The contract requires FilmLA to notify you at least 24 hours before a shoot if you live within 500 feet of the film shoot location or within 500 feet "of production related parking."

However...
If you live in one of the Altadena's neighborhoods with Special Filming Conditions, an earlier notification may be advised. 'May' and not 'shall' because the all Neighborhood Special Filming Conditions are front-loaded with fine print that asserts:
"While these Special Filming Conditions will be included as terms if a permit or filming in this area is issued, they are not intended to and do not, establish the criteria or standards for determining whether or not a particular permit (or permits) will be issued for this area."
For more info about the Altadena Special filming conditions see: Special Filming Conditions for Altadena.

Task 2: 24/7 access
The contract requires FilmLA to operate a 24-hour, 7 -day per week hotline to respond to community concerns. I've heard that a human answers the phone. See Task 3.

Task 3: Track complaints
The contract requires FilmLA to "maintain and operate procedures to investigate and track complaints, and provide a process for complaint resolution." It goes on to say they "shall respond to a complaint within two hours...[and] attempt to reach a resolution within a day."

Here's the type of complaints they are expected to "fully resolve:"
1. Inquiries about what's on a permit including proposed street parking/posting, over-all filming/still photography activity or scenes.

2. Questions about a community survey received by a neighbor. (Note: there is no connection with the post-shoot survey offered here at altadenafilming.org.)

3. Issues and conflicts that would be caused by the filming. The following examples are included: conflict with a scheduled event; impact on business; impact on a neighbors daily routine like access to their home; traffic congestion; lack of parking; big intrusions like gunfire, pyrotechnics, and helicopters; damages to private or public property; and complaints on film/still photography crew behavior.

4. Calls from the County Officials for information about general rules and guidelines and data. For example: the process for obtaining a film permit, the protocol for community surveys or a request for a filming frequency report.

5. Inquiries from neighbors about the permit process, the film company's responsibilities and special issues for particular locations caused by past productions.
FilmLA collects complaints through their website. To file a complaint go to the website and click on the "Take Our Survey Now" button. Here's a link: http://www.filmla.com/neighborhood_filming.php.

There is a catch. The FilmLA survey is only intended for neighbors who have previously contacted FilmLA with a complaint. They use the data to report complaint resolutions rates to the County. If you haven't already filed a complaint, don't bother with the FilmLA survey.

Thanks to NBC4 (who paid for the data), you can see a map of the complaints that have been filed in the City of LA. It's impressive. The map is posted at on the NBC web site.
Here's a link to the NBC4 map of the complaint data. The initial view of the map is misleading; be sure to zoom out and scroll around.

Task 4: Assign monitors
The contract requires FilmLA to assign Monitors, as needed, to film shoots to ensure permit compliance, assist in solving production-related problems, and mediate disputes. i.e. Monitors are not required.

FilmLA has sole responsibility for the assessment and enforcement of filming frequency concerns. However, they are not responsible for enforcement of permit conditions. Apparently that's the job of the on-location law officer. (see Do you feel that a film shoot is ignoring the conditions on the permit? Here's what you can do...). There is no account of how permit conditions are enforced on small shoots when the filming permit does not require an onsite officer. (There was recently a 3-week shoot in our area without either a FilmLA Monitor or onsite law enforcement.)

Task 5: Include Special Filming Conditions on permits
The contract requires FilmLA to ensure that Special Filming Conditions are included in all permits.

Six Altadena neighborhoods have Special Filming Conditions. For information about Special Filming Conditions in Altadena check the report on this website: Special Filming Conditions for Altadena.

Task 6. Community outreach
The contract requires FilmLA to implement community outreach for neighborhoods and commercial districts. Much of the information on this website was provided by FilmLA through their community outreach program.

Who's minding the store?
The FilmLA contract is managed by the LA County CEO. The CEO has appointed a 'project manager' who is responsible for "ensuring that the objectives of this Agreement are met."

The 2014 renewal amendment, the one that extended FilmLA's contract from 2104 thru 2019, identified Frank Cheng as the County's Project Manager for the renewed FilmLA contract. Here's how Mr. Cheng's contact information as it is listed on the 2014 renewal amendment.
Frank Cheng, Manager, Chief Executive Office
County of Los Angeles, Chief Executive Office
500 West Temple Street, Room 726
Los Angeles, California 90012
Telephone: (213) 893-7938
Facsimile: (213) 620-1381
E-Mail Address: fcheng©ceoiacounty.gov
At one point I left a message with the County CEO office requesting a copy of the contract, but no one returned the call. (Imagine that!) In any case, it seems possible that if FilmLA fails to address any of the items list above, you might consider contacting the County's Project Manager.

If anyone tries, please let us know.